Man in a wheelchair smiling

‘Don’t see dementia, see me’ – Free resource to help support people receiving care

‘This is me’ is a free leaflet that can be used to record important details about a person, such as their likes and dislikes. It helps more people with dementia receive personalised care while they are in hospital, a care home, or under the care of health and social care professionals.

If a person with dementia has trouble communicating, they may find some situations distressing.

It may be difficult for them to share information about themselves or to explain what they need. This can make a stay in hospital or a move to an unfamiliar place challenging.

Health and social care professionals can reduce this distress by getting to know who the person really is. If they know more about the person, it can help them deliver care that’s specifically tailored to what the person needs.

What is 'This is me'?

We have produced a new and improved ‘This is me’ leaflet to help health and social care professionals gain a more detailed understanding of a person with dementia.

The new version includes space to write down:

  • a person’s cultural and family background
  • important events, people and places from their life
  • their likes, dislikes and routines. 

‘It was an absolute godsend. I saw real evidence that the leaflet had been read and that staff were using the information provided to engage with my husband.’
- Carer of a person living with dementia

'This is me' – our free leaflet

The new ‘This is me’ is available to download or order now

Get your copy

Getting the most from ‘This is me’

‘This is me’ is most effective when it’s filled in by the individual(s) who know the person best. Wherever possible, the person with dementia should be involved.

It should be completed before the person moves to a new location, for example, into hospital or a care facility.

It should be kept where everyone who cares for the person can easily refer to it. 

The new ‘This is me’ has been developed based on feedback from people living with dementia, carers and care professionals.

‘I like the new categories and the way the sections are divided up … it is more personal’
- Person living with dementia 

‘This is me’ has been endorsed by the Royal College of Nursing since 2010. It has helped to transform care for thousands of people in hospitals, care homes and living at home – more than 840,000 copies have been distributed.

Other ways to help personalise care

Another simple way that professionals can learn more about a person’s character and personality is by using ‘What matters to me’ memory whiteboards.

Insights and notes can be written on a whiteboard that is then displayed where staff will see it.

Here are two examples of 'What matters to me' whiteboards:

What matters to me whiteboards

These two whiteboards were shared by a care support worker, from a team on Ward 2 at Walsall Manor Hospital, via Twitter (@deb30wba)

Get a copy of 'This is me' for free

‘This is me’ is available to download now. Print and fill it out by hand, or edit and save it electronically. Packs of 25 are available to buy (£3.50 plus postage) via our Shop. Alternatively, contact 0300 303 5933 or email [email protected] for help with getting your copy.

One free copy Or, buy a pack of 25
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4 comments

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That's very impressive.

What a lovely healthy idea

I works 15 months with a man of 96 years old and when you see and understand the person really the problems disappear and feels more happy.

My husband is in a nursing home now due to Alzheimer's disease. I see him every day , he only remembers me but he can't remember our children when they come to see him he keeps asking who they are. It's very sad to see him like that but he is very happy when he sees me, it breaks my heart that I am not able to help him in that situation.

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