Daily living

There are ways to make life easier and more enjoyable for a person with dementia. Here is practical advice for those living with dementia and carers.

Advice
Find out why washing and bathing can become difficult for people with dementia, and get practical tips for helping a person to wash.
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This information for carers contains tips for helping a person with dementia to dress and advice on how to make dressing a positive experience for them and for you.
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This information describes some of the dental problems that people with dementia may face at different stages and methods for treatment and prevention, including maintaining good oral health and wearing dentures.
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People with dementia often experience problems with eating and drinking. These web pages describe the most common challenges and why eating healthily is important.
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Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a type of infection common among older people. If a person with a memory impairment or dementia has a UTI, this can cause sudden and severe confusion known as ‘delirium’.
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Dementia causes many changes in people's lives, including changes to sex and intimate relationships. Here we explain how dementia can affect the sexual feelings, desires and needs of people with dementia and their partners. 

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Read our guide to toilet problems and incontinence, including causes, solutions and how this might affect a person with dementia.
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If you are lesbian, gay, bisexual or trans and have dementia, this page is for you. In it we explain how you can live well with dementia.

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For someone with dementia, it's important to remain as fit and healthy as possible. The better they feel, the better life will be for them and those around them.
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Delirium is a common, serious but often treatable condition that starts suddenly in someone who is unwell. Read about the symptoms of delirium, who gets it and how it can be managed.
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Finding out that someone close to you has dementia, and then coping with it from day to day, can be distressing for everyone involved. It can be particularly challenging explaining things to children and young people.

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Pressure ulcers - also called pressure sores or bedsores - can develop if someone spends too long sitting or lying in one position. They are a particular risk for people with dementia.