An empty bed in darkness

Is it typical for people with dementia to sleep a lot during the day?

People with dementia, especially those in the later stages, can often spend a lot of time sleeping. This can sometimes be worrying for carers, friends and family. Find out why a person with dementia might sleep more than an average person of their age.

It is quite common for a person with dementia, especially in the later stages, to spend a lot of their time sleeping – both during the day and night. This can sometimes be distressing for the person’s family and friends, as they may worry that something is wrong. 

Sleeping more and more is a common feature of later-stage dementia. As the disease progresses, the damage to a person’s brain becomes more extensive and they gradually become weaker and frailer over time.

As a result, a person with dementia may find it quite exhausting to do relatively simple tasks like communicating, eating or trying to understand what is going on around them. This can make the person sleep more during the day as their symptoms become more severe. 

Some medications may contribute to sleepiness. These include some antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines and of course sleeping pills.

Sleeping disorders unrelated to dementia, such as having breathing that occasionally stops during sleep (known as ‘apnoea’), can also contribute to sleeping for longer. 

What should I do if a person with dementia is sleeping a lot? 

If the person is in the later stages of dementia and they have gradually started sleeping more and more, it is likely to be due to the dementia progressing.  

However, if the excessive sleeping has started more suddenly, or the person doesn’t seem well in other ways, it may have another cause.  

If this is the case you should speak to the GP, to rule out any infections or conditions that could be affecting the person's sleep.

It may also be worth asking for a medication review with the GP or speaking to a pharmacist as medication can cause a range of side effects. 

If the person is sleeping a lot but it isn’t having a negative impact on them it is often best to just go with it and make sure they are comfortable. 

Why does dementia affect sleep? 

Problems with sleep are very common for people with dementia. They can include: 

  • sleeping during the day and being awake and restless during the night 
  • becoming disorientated in the dark if they wake up to use the toilet 
  • waking up more often and staying awake longer during the night 
  • getting up in the early hours and thinking it’s day time or time to go to work (disorientation in time) 
  • not being able to tell the difference between night and day. 

Nobody completely understands why dementia affects sleeping patterns. For some people, it may be that their internal ‘biological clock’, which judges what time it is, becomes damaged so the person starts to feel sleepy at the wrong time of day.

There are also other parts of the brain which control whether or not we stay awake, and these may also not work properly if they become damaged.  

Sometimes a person with dementia might completely reverse their normal sleep pattern, staying up all night and then sleeping all day. 

Sleep and dementia

It's common for people with dementia, especially in the later stages, to spend a lot of their time sleeping

Does quality of sleep matter for people with dementia? 

The quality of a person's sleep gradually deteriorates as they get older. They tend to get less deep or ‘slow-wave’ sleep, which helps to keep the brain healthy and refreshed. 

Even though a person with dementia may end up sleeping more than a typical person of their age – even as much as 14–15 hours a day – it is unlikely to all be good quality sleep. 

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Discussions about Sleep in our online community, Talking Point...
Discussions about Sleep...

Sleeping a lot can also be influenced by people’s sleeping patterns before they had dementia, as some people need more sleep than others. 

Sleep for people who have dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease 

The type of dementia you have can affect your sleep.

People who have dementia caused by Lewy body disease, such as Parkinsons’ disease (PD) or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are often sleepy by day but have very restless and disturbed nights. They can suffer from confusion, nightmares and hallucinations. Insomnia, sleep apnoea (breathing difficulties) and restless legs are common symptoms. 

A person affected with these types of dementia may often unknowingly ‘act’ out their dreams by shouting and moving around in bed.

They can even cause injury to themselves and/or their sleeping partner. This is called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder or RBD, and tends to happen from the earliest stages of the disease onwards.

This can be exhausting and often leaves the person feeling like they haven’t slept at all, so they are very tired and sleepy during the day.

It can be hard to stay awake during the day after a poor night’s sleep but, if possible, it’s best to try to limit sleep during the day to small bursts or ‘catnaps’. Otherwise the person’s body clock can become very confused and this makes sleeping well during the night even harder.

Read more about sleep and dementia

Learn more about how dementia can affect sleeping patterns, as well as our tips for healthy sleep.

Sleep and dementia
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487 comments

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My husband was diagnosed with Binswamger disease after about 3 years of trying to find out what is wrong with him.
He is extremely forgetful, struggle to dress himself , sleep about 10 hours a night after also napping in the afternoon.
Struggle to verbalise what he wants to say
Also lost a lot of weighth.

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Mu.mom.has vascular dementia also bed bound due back condition
Lost weight differs in out sleep throughout the day
Medication play apart off.sleeping or is that dementia has progressed
Or both.perhaps can be a wake one min a sleep the next

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Hi I would like to state my mother in law has altimers ! She sleeps a lot and eats very little and we find it difficult to give her a bath and she refusedes to take her medicine yet we are dealing with this situation as best as we can ! Our attitude is they were there for us as kids and as baby's now that they need us we have to be there them . In many countries old people are respected yet in this country we just throw them aside like trash ! most families just stick them in a home and forget about them ! Dieing at home with your loved ones as my dad did is the best way to go ! At 65 I hope to be at home or in the middle of the forest just dig a hole and throw me in ! Everyone should pich in to help we did as family !

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I agree with you Harry. My mom is in the late stages of dementia and she is now sleeping very late as late as 5 pm. Yes she was there for me and my sisters and we are here for her.

Mary

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I agree with you as well. We chose what we believed was right for our family and that is caring for my mom at home.
My parents and us lost friends because people didn’t agree with us. They felt we were throwing our life away. It’s not an easy choice. At time it’s incredibly hard. I can say without a doubt I’m thankful for the time with my mom. I’m thankful for the experience to care for her.

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my partner has had parkinsons for 20+yrs he was diagnosed with parkiinsons dementia over a year ago an i had to fight for them to see it was dementia, he gets up about 10am an can be back to bed by 12pm.He would sleep between 4or more hours sometimes more if i dont wake him, will someone tell me honestly is he at the end of his life he is only 62

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Thanks for getting in touch, Margaret. This must be such a worrying time for you.

We'd strongly recommend contacting our Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. Our expert dementia advisers can listen to your situation and offer information, advice, and emotional support. More details about the support line, including opening hours, can be found here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line

We hope this helps for now, Margaret.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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I just want to say all the posts I read are very comforting, yet very sad to know so many people are going through these trying times. I brought my mom, 83 years old, from VA to FL thinking she just needed a restart... please don't judge. I don't need to get into the previous details of how we got to the trip... after a month of getting her stable, I realized it was much more serious... mom was diagnosed with vascular dementia... up until 2 weeks ago, mom had some people convinced she could live on her own. Sure talking to mom for 20 minutes you couldn't tell.
Mom living with us presented a whole different view into her world. Fortunately I am a WFH career.. The past 2 weeks have been yet another phase... mom started having balance issues, now she is wanting to stay in bed more, she has trouble writing. I let mom stay in bed 1 whole day, but the next finally got her to get up and help me with laundry and dinner. I have no idea how this works. Today I had my husband sit with us during lunch and he made the comment, 2 weeks ago mom could function a lot better than now... any advice on how fast progressing is, what to watch for, what kind of small tasks can I give my mom would be greatly appreciated... happening so fast all of a sudden

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Hello Theresa,

It sounds like you would benefit from speaking with a dementia adviser.

As you're based in the US, please contact the Alzheimer's Association helpline: https://www.alz.org/help-support/resources/helpline

In the meantime, we have information on how dementia progresses: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/symptoms-and-diagnosis/how… This is also available as a free, downloadable PDF: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/sites/default/files/2019-09/458lp-the-pro…

We hope this is helpful.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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Thank you so much for your kind words and compassion precious souls around the globe. 🌹

My compassionate action will continue with my Mother Goose because it’s the right thing to do, although I’m losing my mind. 🤪🤪🤪

Blessings and Light to all! ❤️❤️

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I’m struggling what to do about my Dad. He’s 88 and seems to have given up on life. He’s spent 5 days in bed now and asks why he’s in bed.

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Hi Julie,

We're really sorry to hear this. I'm not sure from your comment whether your dad already has a diagnosis, but we'd recommend talking to your GP if he is displaying new symptoms.

We'd also recommend calling our Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. You can talk to one of our trained dementia advisers so they can find out a bit more about your situation, and offer advice and support. More details of the support line (including opening hours) are available here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line

You might also benefit from connecting with other people affected by dementia within our online community, Talking Point. Here, carers and other people affected by dementia share stories, advice, and offer support to others who may be going through similar situations. You can have a browse of other people's experiences, or sign up for free here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/dementia-talking-point-our-on…

We hope this helps.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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Hi precious souls….my name is Amy and I’m taking care of my 90 year old mom who has last stage dementia in New Jersey. I really need someone to talk too. 😢😢. As an only child, I don’t have the option to have a sibling take over for a few days so I could relax because she has become even more verbally hostile than she has always been as a child. Thank God I have my son give her meds at night, but tonight she threw them at him and started crying. 🥺. People say, put her in a home and let them deal with her, but I can never do than because my heart is full of compassionate action, what comes around goes around. ❤️ So if there is anyone in NJ I could talk to just to know I’m not alone, I would truly appreciate it.

Blessings and Light. 🌹

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Hi Amy, thanks for your comment.

It sounds like you might benefit from talking with other people affected by dementia within our online community, Talking Point. Feel free to browse and read others' experiences, or create an account to reply and connect with others. You may find similar situations being discussed about when's the right time to move a person with dementia to a home: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

We also have information on our website about this topic (https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/help-dementia-care/care-homes…) and a downloadable factsheet, which may be helpful (https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/media/12201).

We hope this helps.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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Hi Amy. I am taking care of my 97 year old Mom at home who has Lewy Body Dementia. I have gone through it all. If you need to talk I am here for you. I'm a Jersey girl too.

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My sad was recently diagnosed with Lewy Body Dementia and the practitioner say it’s nothing they can do. Can you give more insights on this disease as it’s not much information pertaining to LBD. Thank you Courtney

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Hello Courtney. Thank you for getting in touch.

We're really sorry to hear about your dad's recent diagnosis. This must be such a difficult time for you and your family.

First, we would strongly recommend speaking with one of our dementia advisers by calling the Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. This is a great way to get dementia information, support and advice specific to your situation. (More information about the support line, including opening times, can be found here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line)

We have information on our website about Lewy Body dementia, also known as dementia with Lewy Bodies (https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/types-dementia/dementia-wi…). This is also available as a downloadable 12-page PDF (https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/sites/default/files/2019-09/what_is_demen…).

If you're looking for real stories or research information about Lewy Bodies, you can use the filter on this page (https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/categories/types/dementia-lewy-bodies) to discover more content.

Lastly, you may benefit from talking with other people affected by dementia within our online community, Talking Point. Feel free to browse and read others' experiences, or create an account to reply and connect with others. You may find similar situations to yours and your dad's shared there: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

Please do call the support line on 0333 150 3456 if you need to speak with someone about this, Courtney.

We hope this is useful.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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HI Amy, like you, I am my moms only caretaker. She is only 70 in the late stages of dementia. It’s REALLY hard for us caretakers. But you CAN manage. I also refuse to put mom in any type of home. I have been with her 24/7 for the last 2 3/4 years. There have been days where she screams for 15 hours a day for absolutely no reason! Talk about stress! With regards to her medication, my suggestion is to wait a few minutes or a half hour and try to give them to her again. 99% of the time she will forget what happened previously. I am originally from RI and moved to Fl 7 years ago. Please know that you are NOT alone! Take some deep breaths, a quick walk outside, put on some headphones, take a hot bath, etc. Wish I could be there to hug you! Sending you much love! If you need to chat let me know. 💋🙏🏻💋🙏🏻💋🙏🏻💋🙏🏻💋🙏🏻

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Hello, my heart goes out to you. My sister an I ste experimenting the same symptoms. It is really sad to see our father who us 88 regress the way he has. The only advice that k can offer is to pray sn ask God for strength. I am here if you need to communicate.

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Hi Amy! I am taking care of my 88 year mom with Alzheimer's...she lives with us and it is hard....i hope you xan get a break ... if there's anyway to pay for an agency call to assist you - check with medicare

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Hi amy I feel so bad for you . I am in florida but I am from New Jersey . I am also taking care of my 90 year old mother. If you would like to talk let me know. My mom is sleeping more lately which has be concerned. Anyway let me know

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I’m an only child as well taking care of my mother and i understand what you’re going through. I live with her and sadly I’m an only child with no children so i often feel so scared of losing my only family and only friend ! Your comment comforted me

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You are not alone, my husband has late stage Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s I am his only care giver and feel so overwhelmed sometimes. At this point I crush his pills and put them in applesauce or pudding if not he will not take them. I hope this will help give it a try you have nothing to loose. Not in NJ but still here to help from Texas

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My dad was diagnosed with Alzheimer's 8 years ago. He has been in a hospital bed at home for 4 years now and has drastically deteriorated over the past year. He hasn't spoken for 4 years and has carers 4 times a day. He spends a lot of time sleeping but has only recently started struggling to eat. He's 83 and my mum's 81. My mum has a carer in the morning to help her shower and get dressed. My dad's illness has had a massive impact on my mums health and she now struggles to do the simplest things. I cook, clean and shop for them. My mum is struggling with the stairs and would benefit from a stair lift. This is a terrible illness and it takes a toll on everyone involved. My mum and I spent years toiletting him, washing him, etc. My mum can hardly was from one room to the other now due to all the lifting. There needs to be more help for the families of people with Alzheimer's.

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I care for my husbands cousin because noone else in the family was prepared to care for him.
He was diagnosed with alcohol induced Dementia but having spoken to the nurse on the Dementia helpline we feel that there is possibly another form of Dementia going on, especially as he has been alcohol free for over 3yrs now.
Like many of you, recently, he has started sleeping for around 21hrs daily.
He tends to sleep ok during the night, although he can get up 3/4 times to go to the toilet. However, he doesn't appear to actually go to the toilet. It's almost as if he is waking up, forgetting what he was going to do & guessing that he must have wanted the toilet, if this makes sense.
He does have Prostrate Cancer & the specialist has told us that although he will never be free if the Cancer, it is likely that the Dementia will kill him before the Cancer does.
I worry that he may not have long left.
As I travel 60 miles most days to care for him, I do not want him to die alone.
I have done an end of life plan with him where he has said that he would like me to be with him at the end.
For me, the difficulty is the not knowing if the rapid deterioration in his mobility & memory along with the constant sleeping is the beginning of the end.
I have taken great comfort & support from reading all your stories & the impact that this horrendous disease has on our loved ones.
It's good to know that I am not alone.
Thank you for sharing your concerns & stories.

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It was impossible for me to believe the diagnosis: my husband - a Ph.d Nuclear Physicist and author - was, at age 85, suffering from Alzheimer's Disease! During the ten years since that fateful day, I have observed, with great sadness, the downward spiral of his thinking process, plus physical symptoms....like incontinence, walking difficulty, and garbled speech

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Reading about your husband reminds of my mum.She’s had Alzheimer’s diease for the last 8 years and I feel there is very little support available.It’s like being on emotional rollercoaster.Just before Covid was announced my mum started to have hallucinations and my elderly dad couldn’t manage.We got a bed in a nursing home for 2 weeks to give us a chance to get help.Then Covid happened and my mum has been in the nursing home since. I’m grateful she’s alive and with us but am struggling as she wants to go home. I want to bring her home but wonder could I manage as her nursing care needs have increased and I’m working full time.It’s so hard as there is very little help in the community for families with a loved one who has Alzheimer’s or a dementia diagnosis.

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This reminds me so much of my late mother was in a care home for 8 years. because we were all working. She was afriaid and always wanted to come home. I often felt that the more my mother's condition deteriorated the less kind care she received. A loved one with Alzheimer's should be with people who know and love them. If I was in a position to have my mother under my roof with carers who could work day and night shifts I would have had my mother with me to the end. To this day I have remorse because I was not there even in the last 2 years. My mother recognized me the day before she passed away. It was heartbreaking.

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We're really sorry to hear about the loss of your mother. Please do call 0333 150 3456 to speak with one of our expert dementia advisers for support. They're available seven days a week - opening hours here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line
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Alzheimer's Society blog team

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I am in the same position as you were not believing my husband’s symptoms, and am now remorseful that I often treated his symptoms as though he was doing things deliberately. It had finally sunk in that I must be more patient and understanding but I am depressed myself and feel so hopeless.

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Hi Sonterra,

Please know you can call our Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456 if you need someone to talk to. Our trained dementia advisers will listen to your situation and offer advice and support. More details of the support line (including opening hours) are available here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line

You might also benefit from connecting with other people affected by dementia within our online community, Talking Point. Here, carers and other people affected by dementia share stories, advice, and offer support to others who may be going through similar situations. You can have a browse of other people's experiences, or sign up for free here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/dementia-talking-point-our-on…

We hope this helps.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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My husband has dementia I think with my outstanding care by feeding him good food all
Ways dinners every day the doctor said hehas had it four years but it has become worse INTHE last two year
HEIS A VERY PEACEFUL PERSON WE HAVE BEEN WED 67 YEARS HE IS 87 sleeps a loti care for him so well at the. Cost of my own health I feel like I am caving in with the stress I am suffering my self I am severly disabledi have carers twice a day for medication and to help cook. Meals every thing is pay up Is the any free support that would help me and of cause. Support. Him i am bottled up with stress and just DONT know and feel the life I. Have is like living. In a cage DONT go out of the house. For months on end and now I am 85 PEOPLE TO TALK all my friends. Have departed

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Hello Edna. Thank you for getting in touch.

We would strongly recommend speaking with one of our dementia advisers by calling the Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. This is a great way to get dementia information, support and advice specific to your situation. (More information about the support line, including opening times, can be found here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line)

Seeking support from the care system can be daunting, particularly for people living with dementia and carers who face many other daily challenges. We have guidance to help you navigate this complex process, including where to go for further help and information: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/blog/how-to-navigate-social-care-system-d…

Lastly, you may benefit from talking with other people affected by dementia within our online community, Talking Point. Feel free to browse and read others' experiences, or create an account to reply and connect with others. You may find similar situations to your husband's shared there: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

Please do call the support line on 0333 150 3456 if you need to speak with someone about this, Edna.

We hope this is useful.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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Hello Edna
I care for my 88 yr old Dad I’m home all time and I understand what your going through
Can your family come help out
I wish you were in New Jersey I would come and visit
If you wish to talk contact me please I’m lonely 😞

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Erica, you might like to talk with other people affected by dementia in our online community, Talking Point. Feel free to browse and read others' experiences, or create an account to reply and connect with others. You may find similar situations to your dad's shared there: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

Wishing you all the best, Erica.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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Hi Erica,
I've been caring for my 85 year old father with dementia for almost 7 years. I understand your loneliness and isolation very well. It's been very difficult. If you would like to talk, my name Missy. My email address is [email protected]. I'd love to hear from you!

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Hi Erica I feel for what you and Edna are going through as I care for my mother and it would be great to catch up with you and compare stay well Iren

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Hello Erica! Read about you caring for for your dad. My wife has dementia. I have been caring for her about 8 years.. I find that soothing music on is calming for her I try to be in always compassiote toward her. Take care of yourself..

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Hello Edna
I am so sorry that you are not getting the support you need and deserve. Are you in touch with your Local Authority Social Services department? They have a duty to assess both your husband’s needs and your needs as a carer. They can help you to find day care or respite care so that you can have a break. Dementia Friends offer telephone calls to support you, as do Admiral Nurses.
I hope you are able to access these services. If you have any daughters/sons/relatives or neighbours to help you get online, the internet is a great source of information.
Best wishes.

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Sending blessings I know how you feel I have been taking care of Mom same way for so long w the help of my boys. I understand you fully praying God send you some angels that He send us both angels. I pray someone honest can come and help and just keep you company. xoxo God sees all.

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Hi Edna. I have been caring for my father in my home for past 2.5 years as well as my severely autistic son as a single mom. I completely understand the stress and loneliness you are experiencing. I have two brothers who are not at all involved because they say its too painful. I hope you are able to find some respite soon.

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I am very sorry about your husband it’s the hardest thing to see them slipping away , get I touch with church maybe some one will give you a hands to go out the house for fue hours once a week or Alzheimer’s Organization maybe they can help

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My husband's had dementia for a while now but now all he does is sleep he doesn't eat I've had him for 41 years can anybody tell me if his end is near . Thank you

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Hi Gina,

We'd recommend speaking with one of our dementia advisers by calling the Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. They will be able to provide you with dementia information and advice specific to you and your husband's situation. (More information about the support line, including opening times, here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line)

It also sounds like you might benefit from talking with other people affected by dementia within our online community, Talking Point. Feel free to browse and read others' experiences, or you can create an account to reply and connect with others who may be going through a similar situation: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

We hope this helps, Gina.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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My wife is in bed 16 hrs per day .she is very confused and forgetful she is 80 yrs old we have been married for 48 yrs

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Hello Vernon,

Thanks for your comment. As the blog mentions, if your wife has gradually started sleeping more and more, it is likely to be due to her dementia progressing. However, if her excessive sleeping has started more suddenly, or she doesn’t seem well in other ways, it may have another cause.

We'd recommend speaking with one of our dementia advisers by calling the Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. They will be able to provide you with dementia information and advice specific to your wife's situation. (More information about the support line, including opening times, here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line)

We also have an online community, Talking Point, where carers and other people affected by dementia can share their experiences and receive peer support. This could be a great place for you to receive helpful suggestions from other people who have been in similar situations: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/dementia-talking-point-our-on…

In the meantime, we have information on our website about sleep problems and treatments, with lots of advice you might find useful: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/symptoms-and-diagnosis/sle…

We hope this helps, Vernon.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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I was wondering the same as my husband is only 65 and has had it now foe 5 years and he has gotten worse this last year. He sleeps all the time. And just up to eat maybe to go out with me for a bit then sleeps once he gets home!
It’s very difficult to see him like this

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I to feel I lost my husband two years ago. He knows me and our children but no communication takes place. I am struggling daily with what Alzheimer’s does to someone you have been with for 49 years. People say I am so strong. If they only new how I feel inside.

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I have just taken early retirement from a job I truly love. But after over 2 years of no sleep and trying to take care of my father and work, I can't do it anymore. Financially it's going to be hard on me, but I have no other choice. My father is 85 and not sure what stage he is in. He sleeps all day and is up every 2 hours during the night, confused, wandering and keeps me up all night. I can't go anywhere because I can't leave him alone. I'm doing my best to take care of him, but physically he is much larger than I am and I'm worried what will happen if he falls or if he would ever get to the stage that I've heard so many talk about, angry and violent.
I've tried to reach out to a number of nursing homes, but I cannot get any help. He gets a little over $2,000 a month with SS and his pension and has prepaid burial plots that he bought in 1962, so they say he has too much money to get help with Medicaid. Homes are $6,000 a month, what do they expect me to do?? He worked all his life and we can't get any help, why?? When do we as a country start taking care of our seniors?! I don't know what I'm going to do in the next 3 to 6 months, he's getting worse each day.

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Hi, I am going through the same thing with my husband and I have the same concerns as you do. Our income is over the threshold for receiving any financial help and it is just enough to get by on.
Our Estate lawyer told me to meet with a Medicaid Attorney who specializes with situations like this. I talked to him and now I feel much better knowing the route we need to take. There is a way to get financial assistance and requires the lawyer to file certain documents with the government. I would advise you to take a chance and see what the Medicaid attorney has to say with about helping your dad. I am so sorry. I took a lot of classes with the Alzheimer organization zoom classes this past winter. It was excellent. They also advised to get an attorney.

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I don’t have any solutions for you, but I am in a similar situation. I am disabled myself and caring for my 80 year old mother. She can’t get any help because she has too much income from my father’s pension, and I can’t get disability because I’m apparently not disabled enough if I can care for her. It’s maddening.

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Have you checked all resources in your state or county? I had to go get my dad when his wife died because she was the one that took care of my dad. My dad has Alzheimer’s pretty bad and it is really hard to see my daddy like this. Unfortunately when I got my dad it was right when covid had just broken out. My dad was taking off all the time and we constantly could not leave him alone. I tried to get him into a assisted living facility and they wanted 4700 a month and my dad only got 1700 from social security. It was so hard I did a lot of research a lot of phone calls and after three months I was able to find a program for my father that helps seniors. I had to do a spend down on my dads monies to a certain amount and once I did they paid 3750 and dads monies paid the rest. It was time consuming on the phone a lot but it really helped in the end to find this place that helps the elderly. I wish you nothing but the best and I hope this helps . God bless you and Dad

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I'm in a similar situation with my mom, she is 84, has dementia, she's restless and confused. Every 3 hours she's waking me up. I found a group of possible live in caregivers to help.me, although, I'm not sure what the cost will be? She sees a Dr. On Friday., so I guess I'll find out if she qualifies for assistance.

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Hi is there anyone out there whose relative has Lewy body dementia with Alzheimers?

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Hi Angela,

It sounds like you might benefit from talking with other people affected by dementia within our online community, Talking Point. Feel free to browse and read others' experiences, or you can create an account to reply and connect with others who may be going through a similar situation: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

You can also speak with one of our Dementia Advisers by calling the Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. They will be able to provide you with dementia information and advice. (More information about the support line, including opening times, here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line)

We hope this helps.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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Hi Yes my husband has late stage Lewy body .He is very weak and is so thin.What is it you want to know.

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Thank you...My mum in law has lewy body too. She sleeps practically all day her legs are stiff although she can walk but not far. She uses a stick im her full time carer just not sure what stage she is in xx

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Hi!
I’d like to talk to you about it. My dad has Lewy body & early stage Parkinson's and is thin as a rail. He has REM disorder, sleeps a lot & his weight is deteriorating rapidly. He’s 96.

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What would you like to know. Myhusband died a month ago .I looked after him at home for6years.I have a lot of experience .

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Yes my Mom has it, she is 83 years old.

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They have never confirmed what kind of dementia my Mom has. However, I have been caring for her for about 7 years and I am convinced it is Lewy Body. She is now late stage and the physical demands are now getting too much for me. It kills me seeing her like this - Not knowing who her family is or where she is in time. Can’t walk anymore and is starting to have difficulty swallowing when eating. It pains me to even be writing this. Feel so guilty for ever getting short tempered from lack of sleep and mental/emotional exhaustion!🥺

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my mother does

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Hi Angela
My mom was diagnosed with Lewy Body . I would love to connect . [email protected]

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