Pillows and sheet in bed - sleeping with dementia

Is it typical for people with dementia to sleep a lot during the day?

People with dementia, especially those in the later stages, can often spend a lot of time sleeping. This can sometimes be worrying for carers, friends and family. Find out why a person with dementia might sleep more than an average person of their age.

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It is quite common for a person with dementia, especially in the later stages, to spend a lot of their time sleeping – both during the day and night. This can sometimes be distressing for the person’s family and friends, as they may worry that something is wrong. 

Sleeping more and more is a common feature of later-stage dementia. As the disease progresses, the damage to a person’s brain becomes more extensive and they gradually become weaker and frailer over time.

As a result, a person with dementia may find it quite exhausting to do relatively simple tasks like communicating, eating or trying to understand what is going on around them. This can make the person sleep more during the day as their symptoms become more severe. 

Some medications may contribute to sleepiness. These include some antipsychotics, antidepressants, antihistamines and of course sleeping pills.

Sleeping disorders unrelated to dementia, such as having breathing that occasionally stops during sleep (known as ‘apnoea’), can also contribute to sleeping for longer. 

What should I do if a person with dementia is sleeping a lot? 

If the person is in the later stages of dementia and they have gradually started sleeping more and more, it is likely to be due to the dementia progressing.  

However, if the excessive sleeping has started more suddenly, or the person doesn’t seem well in other ways, it may have another cause.  

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Discussions about Sleep in our online community, Talking Point...
Discussions about Sleep...

If this is the case you should speak to the GP, to rule out any infections or conditions that could be having an impact.

It may also be worth asking for a medication review with the GP or speaking to a pharmacist as medication can cause a range of side effects. 

If the person is sleeping a lot but it isn’t having a negative impact on them it is often best to just go with it and make sure they are comfortable. 

Why does dementia affect sleep? 

Problems with sleep are very common for people with dementia. They can include: 

  • sleeping during the day and being awake and restless during the night 
  • becoming disorientated in the dark if they wake up to use the toilet 
  • waking up more often and staying awake longer during the night 
  • getting up in the early hours and thinking it’s day time or time to go to work (disorientation in time) 
  • not being able to tell the difference between night and day. 

Nobody completely understands why dementia affects sleeping patterns. For some people, it may be that their internal ‘biological clock’, which judges what time it is, becomes damaged so the person starts to feel sleepy at the wrong time of day.

There are also other parts of the brain which control whether or not we stay awake, and these may also not work properly if they become damaged.  

Sometimes a person with dementia might completely reverse their normal sleep pattern, staying up all night and then sleeping all day. 

Sleep and dementia

It's common for people with dementia, especially in the later stages, to spend a lot of their time sleeping

Does quality of sleep matter for people with dementia? 

The quality of a person's sleep gradually deteriorates as they get older. They tend to get less deep or ‘slow-wave’ sleep, which helps to keep the brain healthy and refreshed. 

Even though a person with dementia may end up sleeping more than a typical person of their age – even as much as 14–15 hours a day – it is unlikely to all be good quality sleep. 

Sleeping a lot can also be influenced by people’s sleeping patterns before they had dementia, as some people need more sleep than others. 

Sleep for people who have dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson’s disease 

The type of dementia you have can affect your sleep.

People who have dementia caused by Lewy body disease, such as Parkinsons’ disease (PD) or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are often sleepy by day but have very restless and disturbed nights. They can suffer from confusion, nightmares and hallucinations. Insomnia, sleep apnoea (breathing difficulties) and restless legs are common symptoms. 

A person affected with these types of dementia may often unknowingly ‘act’ out their dreams by shouting and moving around in bed.

They can even cause injury to themselves and/or their sleeping partner. This is called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder or RBD, and tends to happen from the earliest stages of the disease onwards.

This can be exhausting and often leaves the person feeling like they haven’t slept at all, so they are very tired and sleepy during the day.

It can be hard to stay awake during the day after a poor night’s sleep but, if possible, it’s best to try to limit sleep during the day to small bursts or ‘catnaps’. Otherwise the person’s body clock can become very confused and this makes sleeping well during the night even harder.

Read more about sleep and dementia

Find out whether poor sleep is a risk factor for dementia, and what you can do to encourage better sleep.

Sleep and dementia
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266 comments

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hi
my gran suffers from dimentia she went from pacing up and down to just laying all the time and has forgotten everyone lost a lot of weight very fast my worry is no matter what we do she has this bad odour like a inner smell is there something wrong also her hands stay cold no matter what the last few days all her fingers and toes tips is blue/purple in colour im very worried what can this be

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Hi Dee, thanks for your comment.

It sounds like a really worrying time for you. We would recommend speaking with one of our dementia advisers on 0333 150 3456 for information, advice and support: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line

If you're looking to talk to others who may be going through a similar situation as you, take a look at our online community, Talking Point. Share your experiences and ask questions, or just read what other people affected by dementia have to say: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

We hope this helps, Dee.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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I have worked in hospitals and units for dementia patients and I can say it sounds like she is in the end stages of her life. Im so sorry to be blunt. My grandmother has dementia and she is coming quickly to the end stage herself. Im so sorry. This is a terrible disease. Its hard on everyone involved.

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Hi. My mother (76) has recently had a uti and her dementia has gotten drastically worse. extreme exhaustion has completely taken over which the doctors say is “just part of the disease”. The thing is she’s always asking “why am I so tired and when will it go away”? and she breaks down crying and is in visible emotional distress.. It’s absolutely devastating to see her this way. I would almost feel better if she was oblivious to always being so tired and sleeping all day, but the fact that she is aware something is wrong and is sad about it is really a concern for me. She’s had many blood tests over the last few weeks and the doctors have come up with nothing. They just keep saying it’s part of the disease...

Any advice would be much appreciated.

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Hi Brad, thanks for getting in touch.

We're sorry to hear about your mother's dementia progressing since the UTI. This must be a really difficult time for you and your family.

For expert advice, we'd recommend speaking with one of our dementia advisers on 0333 150 3456 for information and support: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line

If you're looking to talk to others going through a similar situation, take a look at our online community. Share your experiences and ask questions on Talking Point, or just read what other people affected by dementia have to say: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

Lastly, in case you haven't seen it, we have a factsheet specifically on UTIs and dementia that may be of interest: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/sites/default/files/2019-09/528LP%20UTIs%… There is also an article about a man whose father experienced a progression in his dementia following a UTI: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-together-magazine/april-may-2018…

We hope this helps for now, Brad.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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Hi my mother is 90 and lives on her own. Myself and my brother live 5 minutes away from her with our own families. My mother in the last few month memory has become very bad repeating the same question over and over again, we have put this down to her age, but recently she has become very awkward and blaming neighbours saying they are coming into her garden and stealing things from her garage and giving them her rubbish saying they put it in her bin, she will not listen to reason. The latest is neighbours are coming into her house and moving things. I have contacted the doctor but unless she goes there herself there is nothing we can do. She cooks for herself and some days are better than others, but my brother and myself are at a lost as to what to do now. A home isn’t a option as she is looking after herself but it’s the things she thinks are happening to her we not sure how to handle. Her neighbours are ringing us up more and more now and won’t take to much more of her, she shouting at them, for things she thinks they are doing. please can someone advise as to what we should do.

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Hello D, thanks for getting in touch.

A person with dementia may make accusations against people around them, including their family, friends and carers. The most common accusations are that others are trying to steal from them or harm them. Often the person’s accusations are based on a delusion or hallucination. Learn more about perception and hallucinations here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/symptoms-and-diagnosis/per…

For advice on what to do, we'd recommend speaking with one of our trained dementia advisers who can listen to the situation regarding your mother and provide tips. You can call the Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line

Some people also find it helps to talk to others going through similar experiences. If that appeals to you, you could have a look at our online community, Talking Point. You can share your experiences and ask questions of the community here, or just read what other people have to say: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

We really hope this is helpful for now. Remember to call our helpline whenever you need dementia advice or support.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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Hi just read your story and wanted to let you know you are not alone I have the same problem with my dad he’s had Demetia for about 6 years now and I’ve been through everyone is pinching stuff but I’m very firm with him I sit him down and explain that because his brain isn’t working like it should be anymore these things happen and it makes you think things are going missing but I always find what’s missing which makes him see that every thing is ok I’m always honest but firm with him as he can be awkward a lot of the time but the way I deal with it seems to work it may not work for your loved one as all Demetia patients are different I just thought this may help. Very kind regards joanne

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Thank you Joanne for your comments, we are having lots of trouble at the moment with her putting her rubbish in her neighbours garden, I have tried to explain to her that it is her rubbish and even shown her the contents but she still disagrees, my brother and myself have got to the stage where nothing we can do is right but two days later she will be fine again. None of the family enjoys visits now it a horrible thing to say but she’s certainly not the same person she used to be. Thank you again for taking the time to write it’s nice to hear other people experiences and how they deal with
It.

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Hello, I am 27 and moved in with my great aunt who helped raise me. I moved in 2 years ago and she was diagnosed with vascular dementia in November of 2017 but believe she had it earlier due to the things people from her bank and etc. was telling me. The rest of my family wanted to put her in a nursing home but I went to get her from the hospital before they could. She has recently started sleeping throughout the day and will be up maybe 4-5 hours daily maximum. She has a hard time swallowing now but has had two Carotid artery surgeries on her throat years ago. Her sleeping really concerns me, she still does a lot of ADLs such as bathroom use and showers on her own. She walks fine still but the sleeping and her irritation is concerning me. She sees things and hears things that aren’t there and also believe and swears she is married to our neighbor. Obviously, she asks questions over and over because she doesn’t remember but all of these things are very concerning and worrying to me. I am not sure the stages of Vascular dementia or what to expect because I am young but have been a CNA since I was 18. She has some incontinence during sleep and also talks and screams in her sleep. I can’t keep her awake, she takes donepazil and another memory pill but it somehow has gotten so much worse. Does anyone have any experience with this that can help me on the stages and what to expect? My heart hurts so bad.

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Hello Bambi,

Thanks for getting in touch. We're really sorry to hear about how tough things have been with your great aunt.

If you're based in the UK, please know you can call our Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456 for advice, information or emotional support. Our dementia advisers are here to listen and provide support when you need them: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-connect-support-line

Some people also find it helps to talk with other people who have gone through or are going through similar experiences. The best place to do this is within our online community, Talking Point: https://forum.alzheimers.org.uk/

In the meantime, we do have information about how vascular dementia progresses on our website that is available to download as a PDF by clicking 'Save this information': https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/symptoms-and-diagnosis/how… As well as more general information about it, and what causes it: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/about-dementia/types-dementia/vascular-de…

We hope this is helpful, Bambi.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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I've noticed the same sleeping pattern with my wife. She is 64 and I'm 62. She started having memory issues about 10 years ago. Since then I have seen her progress through all the stages of dementia. In the past year she has started to sleep throughout the day and is only awake for 4-5 hours. It is no problem for me as I work from home right next to where she sleeps. She can't do much on her own except eat. She is otherwise healthy for her age and I'm happy to still have her

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Your Aunts symptom are very similar to those my mother had. After much research and documentation, I deduced she had Parkinson. Moms hand would also tremor. After a hospital stay, we visited her Neurologist. I didn't feel satisfied with the answers I received, so I respectfully challenged the physician. The doctor said mom should see the Chief of Neurology; and what did he say?!? Mom had Parkinson's. He prescribed her Carbidopa-Levodopa and within 2 weeks, no more incontinence, no more extreme cognitive issues, no more confusion, no more excessive fatigue, no more night wandering, etc.

I hope this reply provides you some information to assist your Aunt to having some quality of life in her later years.

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Trazadone helped my mom sleep thru the night. Olanzapine helped calm the brain a little.

This is a very sad disease to watch. If you can, take care of the person at home. It's expensive... But worth it.

I'm now dealing with mom swallowing. This is very heartbreaking. Feeding her magic cup ice cream 290 calories .... And boost drink 530 calories.

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Hi Bambi,

I had the same problems with my husband when they put him on the donepezil pill, he got worse... more than that, he got angry and irritated. I took him back and they double the dosage... within a week, I knew that wasn't the answer and called the doctor and let them know I was taking him off of all medications.

Once I did that, he got back to normal. He sleeps a lot... still very forgetful, but no more angry fighting.

I learned his behavior and learned my way around them. It's been a year now, and for the first time in a year we are on vacation together at Lake Havasu. I learned to wrap my self with a backbelt like I see the girls behind the counter at store wear. This keeps my muscles in place while I gently lift him.

I prayed and was shown a much easier way to get him up. I place a piece of ice on his back and he just jumps up.... bet that's not in any book!!!... I told it to a nurse and she said she never heard of this in her 25 year experience.

I love him soooo much..... I hug him when he gets angry or irritated.... he tries to puch me away and I hold on... he stops. I kiss him on his forehead and cheeks.... and also say "I love you soooo much".

It's a journey...... God is on it with me.

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Gloria,
God Bless you for following what your heart was telling you. I hope you’re able to keep your husband with you until God calls him home.
My Mom was Dx with Alzheimer’s by her primary care physician 4 years ago. Looking back, there were signs at least a year before that.
Mom was put on Nemetine and Donepizel.
It only made things worse as well as a drop BP.
To others also reading this, I’ve seen my Mom go through each stage. She started by not recognizing her car keys that were on a big sunflower key chain. She would pull up my beautiful flowers saying they were weeds, broke my coffee maker and rain gauge. She couldn’t remember how to use them and she got rough with the equipment. She was delusional about friends ,family and neighbors. He neighbor on the other side of her kitchen wall was spying on her, she’d swear people were knocking on her door, trying to get in, family were making fun of her and her friends didn’t want to speak to her. She was incredibly paranoid —- putting a chair under her door to prevent people from entering, checking under her bed and every closet each time she came in. For a long time she carried a small purse and was CONSTANTLY checking the papers to make sure it was all in there. It was making all of us crazy. It was an obsession.
She was sepsis with pneumonia and a UTI and suffered a mild stroke on the day the hospital wanted to discharge her. Finally got her neurologist involved and he confirmed the obvious, she had a stroke. While she was in rehab for two weeks, I hid her purse in a drawer at her apt. By the time she came home, that habit was forgotten.
Mom was a very clean and neat person. She was very beautiful and took great care with her hair, make up, clothes and shoes. Her decline continued by dressing oddly. Shorts and knee socks to go outside in winter, forgetting to put on a blouse and wearing only an open cardigan and exposing her breasts. She went to the dining room twice with no pants. I could no longer continue the pace of caring for her when she became urine incontinent and was leaving bowel movements in places other than the toilet. I went to her apt daily and the mess and her attitude wore me out. She wasn’t sleeping at night, she’d be wandering or pulling all of her clothes out of her closet and stacking them on her bed and furniture. I would put it all away every day. I was washing comforters, sheets, towels and clothing daily. It was SOOOO exhausting.
After 2.5 years of this, on top of managing her finances, medical appointments and medications, I picked out an Assisted Living Facility for Mom. Surprisingly, she never asked about her former place one single time.
After 9 months of her living there, COVID -19 hit the United States and I went months and months without seeing Mom. Finally, it got so bad for both of us, my family decided Mom should come and live in our home.
I haven’t spent an entire day with her in 6 months. She’s very weak and sleeps all the time.
I’m taking her to be checked for a UTI. And until that point, I won’t know if her weakness is because of the UTI or if it’s the disease progression. But now Im lifting her out of bed and from a chair.
The Neurologist diagnosed Mom with Frontal-Temporal Lobe Dementia. Which causes aphasia and mom is unable to create a sentence. But she CAN sing an entire song like a professional!! Mom is easily agitated to yelling by: Giving her Assistance, whether it’s helping her up, put food on her spoon, change her diapers, shower and wash hair and remove her dentures. Mom doesn’t understand how to remove them. This is a NOT a pretty sight or sound removing them for cleaning and tissue health.
For those whose loved ones are having sleepless issues, we had the best luck with Mirtazipine and Seroquel.
I wish all of us nothing but the best on this journey! God Bless all ♥️🙏😘

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My Mom has dementia & she always talking about going to her Mom house & her Mom is deceased & always asking where my dad is, he is also deceased, up late at night walking, fuss about eating sometimes, dont want to leave the house, a lot of sleeping during the daytime. My husband & I are her caregivers, but sometimes I get very frustrated. What stage could she be be in. She always forgetten

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Hello Margaret,
We're sorry to hear this - it sounds like a really difficult time for you and your husband.
If you are based in the UK, we recommend speaking with one of our dementia advisers to discuss the situation. They will be best placed to provide you with advice and support. Please call our Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. (More information on opening times: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/dementia-connect-support-line)
If you're based in the US, please contact the Alzheimer's Association helpline: https://alz.org/help-support/resources/helpline Or if you're based in Canada, please contact the Alzheimer's Society of Canada helpline: https://alzheimer.ca/en/Home/ContactUs
In the meantime, you may find our article on what to say to a person with dementia who asks to go home: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/blog/i-want-go-home-what-to-say-to-someon…
Wishing you all the best, Margaret.
-
Alzheimer's Society blog team

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My Father 70, dignosed demetia few years back, his hands often trembels now, he had sleeping issue as most of the time he was sleeping..but after visiting a neurologist.. things were ok as he use to sleep and night and wakup durinf day but since last night he is slespy, after last night light dinner, he has not eaten anything and still sleeping, we even tried to make him awake but it did not work ..what shiuld we do, should we let him sleep? Because we are worry as he has not eaten since last evening.? Please suggest?

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Put food close to his mother.... it must have a really good smell.... he might open and eat, even if he goes right back to sleep. I feed my husband like that all the time so he won't go so long without food.

Hope this helps.
GloriaT

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Hi thanks for your feedback, my father passed away last week..he was una le to eat/drink for last atleast 3 days...so...I wish you all the best is well

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Farooq, I am sorry for your loss. 😞

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Thank you very much for your care, in other way it was hard to see him daily dying ad there is nothing one can do,except hoping and praying..I wish you all the best..

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My Mom is 93 has dementia gets very angry some times iam her son Billy and at times she ask me where is her son Billy . Plus she lies about things very frustrating.

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This information has been very useful for me. Reading other people’s comments are distressing because my husband is nowhere near as bad. But I worry about the future and haw I am coping and how I will cope in the future. I am just taking each day as it comes.

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My dad had went from walking with walker onhis ownto not walking hardly at all on the last 5 weeks. This last week up 2 nights sleeps 1. Them up 3 nights tilno sleep till 4 and has only woke up to pee 5 times today and it is now 11:44 pm. Refuses to eat just drinks water. Iwhat stage is this and will began to sleep normally again

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Hi Teresa,

Thanks for your comment. Really sorry to hear that you and your dad have been having a difficult time.

One of our trained dementia advisers can give support you with this - please call our Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. You can talk to them so we can find out a bit more about your situation and provide ideas, information and advice. More details of the support line (including opening hours) are available here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/national-dementia-helpline

Hope this is helpful, Teresa.

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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My patient is 87 and sleeps 20 to 22 hours a day I try and get her up but she refuses and she’s hardly eating now! It’s very disheartening for me! It’s happened so fast

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My mum is like this now she's 89
Dont know what to do

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Hang in there talk to you children make sure the whole family is in the same page as you. I am in same boat but with help of family and friends I am not alone. You need some me time even if it is just around the block. You need to take care of your self or u can take care of your Mom. Best exercise can be listen to music you enjoy watch tv stay away from politics as it will just stress you out. Most Important thing Take Care Of You

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This is why I am on here. Looking up if it’s okay to sleep for almost 24 hrs... my grandpa has been asleep since 4am and it’s currently 1am the next day.

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My son had a motor bike accident some years ago and now and hzs been suffering epilepsy. Some good fays some bad . It breaks my heart as l now have other health problems and feel pretty useless . Please advice . Thankyou ! I wish l had a magic wand to heal us all !

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Hi Linda,

Thanks for your comment.

You may want to look at the information and support provided by Epilepsy Action:
https://www.epilepsy.org.uk/

They are a UK epilepsy charity with a range of support options that may be appropriate for you and your son.

Hope this helps,

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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My husband is 71. I have noticed signs of dementia for like 5 years. He has Lewy bodies. Has tremors in his hands and arms. I noticed he has had a severe decline in the last year. Used to be able to take walks. Now he shuffles and I need to hold onto him. He is very tired during the day. At first it was so hard to accept this was happening. Now I just try to take it one day at a time. Not really sure what stage he is in. If I were to guess I would say stage 5 or 6. I have to take care of all his needs showering, shaving, assisting with the toilet. It breaks my heart!!!!

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If he shuffles then maybe he needs a shunt surgery

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I really appreciate your plight. My mother in law has recently moved in with us and I do exactly the same. When I remember how she was I'm heartbroken like you but I'm the one who has to deal with it. She does sleep a lot but the bodily functions she can't control makes her like a baby. It's not her fault but sometimes I could scream. Just take a breath and think tomorrow may be better!!

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I completely understand , i silently scream on a daily basis . My mum has mixed dementia and is 86 . Keep remembering you are doing your best for your loved one but save some compassion for yourself

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My husband is 78 same with everything you mentioned😢

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I feel you pain you are doing the best thing by Sharing there are many people just like you.You must take care of yourself 1st then you can help him. Talk to others exercise these are small things but they help u and keep u safe and healthy If u do not take care of u you can not take of him

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The tremors, shuffling (gait) is what mom experienced as well. On one of my replies, I failed to mention shuffling was one of the symptoms. Now she's a lot better.

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So sorry. Praying for you. My dad is 79 and he’s in stage 5 or 6. It’s hard. I feel bad for them because they’re confused and sometimes scared. Find peace. You’re husband is extremely blessed to have you. Continue to take it one day at a time. That’s all we can do. You’re not alone. Big hug 🤗 ❤️

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Hi, I'm in the same boat. My husband is 81 and has Parkinsons and Lewy body dementia. All the same symptoms.He wasn't able to turn over to get out of bed so I got him a hospital bed and it made a world of difference. He uses the rails to get up. He also uses a lift chair to get up. I have to do all the same thingsfor him. Hang in there

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Hi Dale. My husband, 73, was diagnosed with vascular dementia 4 years ago after a major stroke. It also led to seizures which can only be stopped in intensive care. He was diagnosed as frailty 5 last time he was in hospital. That was only two months ago. Now he can't walk without hanging on to me. He can no longer use a rollator and for the last week he is sleeping more and more in the day but awake at night. Like you I have to shower, shave and now toilet him. I wish he was unaware but he knows what is happening to him and cries all the time. I'm sure this must be stage 6 or 7 too.

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Hi, My father aged 59 has vascular dimentia since 2014, who sleeps all the day around 16-18 hours. But now the situation is worse, he is not sleeping even for an hour. He is sleepless for over night. He is not even taking solid food and fruits and his activities differs from the last year, like he is not going for the toilet properly and some mental issues. We felt very bad for this and affraiding of his health.

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Hi Babu,

Thanks for your comment, I'm sorry to hear about these changes in your father.

If you need any information, advice or support, please do call our Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456. You can talk to a dementia adviser on this number, who will listen to your situation and suggest some ideas to help make things better. More details of the support line (including opening hours) are available here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/national-dementia-helpline

Hope this is hellpful,

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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My husband has Lewy body Dementia, he was a lot that way.My husband would walk for hours. We finally had to start giving him finger food and he ate jt while walking.

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Thank you very much for the info on excessive sleeping. I had my wife get a cognitive exam 5yrs ago.the dr. said "she's a normal 68 yrs old woman" I don't believe that."I live with her. How do I broch the subject with my wife"s doctor w/out embarrising her.

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Hi Jonathan,
Thanks for getting in touch - that does sound like a difficult situation.
One of our dementia advisers can support you with this - please call our support line on 0333 150 3456. You can talk to them so we can find out a bit more about your situation and provide information and advice. More details of the support line (including opening hours) are available here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/national-dementia-helpline
Hope this is helpful,
Alzheimer's Society blog team

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My mom is 92 1/2 yrs old. She has started sleeping a lot during the day and sometimes falls asleep while eating meals . In the early evening she will stay awake for about 2 hrs and fall back to sleep and then I have to wake her up to put her to bed by 9pm. She does take some anxiety meds for demenitia and takes sleep meds before bed . She has been waking up at 2am. and refuses to stay in bed .we bring her downstairs and then she proceeds to fall asleep in the chair. What could that be ? The later stages like stage 4 and maybe the closing of life

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My mother who is 80+ plus, has Alzheimer's and focal epilepsy. Alongwith other conditions such as diabetes, cholesterol etc.. . she use to sleep alot but is now sleeping even more and a very deep sleep. She use to wake up at meal times and eat - now I basically have to force feed her..
I have to get her to eat and take her meds on time ..
Is this common for Alzheimer's- what do you do to get the patient to eat?

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Hi Majida, thank you for getting in touch, we're very sorry to hear about your mother's sleeping and eating problems.

We would first recommend speaking with your mother's GP about these changes in behaviour.

We have some information on eating here which might be helpful: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/blog/what-can-genetic-tests-tell-us-about

You can also call our Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456 for more information, advice and support. More details on our phone support (including opening hours) are available here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/national-dementia-helpline

Hope this is helpful,

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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My 77year old husband has I believe started with dementia a good while ago but gets angry when I try talk about it I went see his doctor who at first was helpful and got him into the surgery under false pretences after a talk suggested to my husband went to a memory clinic, he refused. He is so bad tempered, suspicious. always dropping of to sleep and even asked where I was when talking to me. I have been doctors three times in secret and got nowhere. I really need help but what can I do?

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Hi Valerie,
Thanks for getting in touch, and sorry to hear about your husband.

This sounds like a really difficult situation - particularly if you've already been encouraging him to see the doctor and feel like you haven't got anywhere.
We have some advice on our website for how to offer help to somebody who doesn't want it. You may find this useful to read: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/blog/how-offer-help-someone-dementia-who-…

You may also find it helpful to speak to a dementia adviser. You can call our Dementia Connect support line on 0333 150 3456 and somebody will be able to learn more about your situation and give tailored information, advice and support. You can read more details about the support line (including opening hours) here: https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/national-dementia-helpline

Hope this is helpful,

Alzheimer's Society blog team

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My grandpa is 85 years old and on my last Christmas he was acting like someone else and so my parents took him to the emergency room and they said he had Alzheimer’s and damenshia and he always says that we are people from the past and he always mixes up day and night and is always waking up and argues to go back to bed and he gets so angry and he gets so mad that we won’t let him leave because he falls and we take care of him and it’s just sad.

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