Kids books and comics that could help when explaining dementia to children

We look at books and comics about dementia that are aimed at younger readers.

Dementia Superheroes and Me and Mrs Moon

Dementia Superheroes

Our comic book series makes dementia a little less scary for primary school-aged children. Monthly packs include activities, collectable cards and a comic that shows how children can become ‘dementia superheroes’ themselves.

Donate and sign up for your child. 

Me and Mrs Moon

Maisie and Dylan love Mrs Moon, but strange things start happening. What can the children do? Love, loyalty and resilience shine through this graphic novel – based on real events – about two children determined to help their friend. For ages seven and above.

Me and Mrs Moon, by Helen Bate (Otter-Barry, 2019), 48 pages, £12.99, ISBN: 9781910959947. 

My dad and Al and The memory journeys

My dad and Al 

When Charlie's dad is told he has Alzheimer's, the family think of it as an unwanted guest called Al who they can blame, and even laugh at, for the things he makes Dad do. A book from a former teacher that helps families talk to children aged eight-plus about dementia. 

My dad and Al, by Annie Laurie (AuthorHouse UK, 2019) 40 pages, £14.99, ISBN: 9781728390321. 

The memory journeys 

A story for children aged six to nine that portrays changes in behaviours and roles as dementia develops. The book is supported by an education toolkit with games, puzzles and a prompt sheet for parents reading it with a child. 

The memory journeys, by Charlie Draper and Caroline Blanchette (YPWD Berkshire, 2016), 30 pages, £5.99, ISBN: 9781366869630. 

Explaining dementia to children and young people

How children and young people can be affected when someone close to them has dementia, and how to help them feel secure and involved.

Read more

Dementia together magazine: Oct/Nov 19

Dementia together magazine is for everyone in the dementia movement and anyone affected by the condition.
Subscribe now
Dementia together magazine is for everyone in the dementia movement and anyone affected by the condition.
Subscribe now

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