Matt Hancock meets the Jelly Drops team

Jelly Drops sweets available now - a simple and tasty way to boost daily water intake

Alzheimer’s Society has supported the development of Jelly Drops, bite-sized sweets designed to increase your water intake. Find out about the latest progress on the development of this exciting product.

This article was first published on 14 June 2019 and updated on 13 July 2020. 

What are Jelly Drops?

Jelly Drops are a bite-sized, sugar-free sweets containing 95 per cent water and added electrolytes. 

They were invented by Lewis Hornby, who was inspired by his grandmother and her love for sweets. Lewis developed bright, raindrop-shaped sweets as an easy way to increase her daily water intake. 

Lewis and his Jelly Drops team have worked alongside people with dementia, doctors and dementia psychologists to develop their fantastic product. 

Alzheimer’s Society is delighted to have partnered with Lewis and the Jelly Drops team over the last year through our Accelerator Programme

We are excited to announce that the Jelly Drops team have begun to deliver their fantastic product. 

Jelly drops

Lewis Hornby and his grandmother.

How Jelly Drops have helped people during the coronavirus pandemic

During the coronavirus pandemic, the Jelly Drops team have worked even harder to make their water sweets available to the most vulnerable people in our society.

People living in care homes have been a primary concern for the Jelly Drops team during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Jelly Drops team are also helping to cater to a small number of NHS coronavirus hospital wards, not just for the patients but also for the NHS staff. Members of staff are finding that long shifts and personal protective equipment (PPE) often leave them feeling dehydrated. 

Dehydration and dementia

Dehydration is a common challenge for older people, and especially those with dementia. Memory problems mean that people living with dementia can often forget to drink enough water. 

What’s more, the part of the brain that tells you when you’re thirsty, doesn’t always work properly. Unfortunately, this can lead to confusion and even hospitalisation.

Jelly Drops team

The Jelly Drops team.

How can I get some Jelly Drops? 

There has been a huge demand for Jelly Drops since they were first introduced to the public in June 2019.

Since then, the Jelly Drops team have been building up large-scale production as fast as they can. 

You can now order Jelly Drops online, either as a one-off purchase or subscription.

To get hold of your own Jelly Drops, visit the Jelly Drops website today.
 

Order Jelly Drops today

You can buy a single tray of Jelly Drops, or start a subscription via the website.

Buy Jelly Drops

120 comments

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Sounds fantastic. I have trouble getting my 95 year old Mom to drink enough especially in this extreme weather
Please get them available ASAP thank you

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We have an Order of Catholic Nuns here in New Orleans who care for the dying in their homes. Getting them to take enough fluids is often a struggle. I wonder if your product would aid them as well? I know they give some of their patients candy to suck on to help them.

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These sound like a fantastic idea, I’ve heard about these for quite a while and looking forward to when I can buy some

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Wow what a great innovative idea! Can dementia patients who have diabetes take these Jelly water drops too? I would certainly be interested in doing a free trial of this product for my mother in law.

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I too have difficulty getting my Mum to drink she is still able to chew little pieces of soft food i now g iv e her water Mellon but would like to try jelly drops when the are available

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7

I am a community carer and I hope to see thses come out very soon. Hope to hear from you soon.

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6

Really excited for when these are on sale! My granddad would benefit from these massively as well as all the lovely elderly people I work with! Sometimes it’s a struggle to get people to keep their fluids up and sadly I can’t always be there to pester them due to being busy with other patients / jobs! Amazing idea!!!!!

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5

Is it safe for diabetics to eat helly drops???

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I would to have some. My wife would certainly benefit. Paul

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Great idea,I am a carer for a living, the elderly in general struggle to keep hydrated, the size is an issue, and being diabetic also, but what a brilliant young man .....

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8

I think the Jelly drops are a fantastic idea, but please consider their sugar content. Elderly patients are at a higher risk of dental caries, especially in care facilities. Frequent sugary snacks may increase the amount of caries in these already frail patients.

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What a super idea - and not just for people with dementia. We were always trying to get my elderly mother to drink enough.

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This sounds like a fantastic aid for people at risk of dehydration. My husband was hospitalised last year with it. Although probably not something that should be considered a replacement for liquids it is certainly an innovative bonus. It will also be useful for people like my husband who suffers from drooling and was advised to suck sweets to help to control it. These sound like a more healthy way to achieve this.

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As an oral health Improvement Specialist I too am concerned about the sugar content of this product. Whilst I completely understand the issue of low fluid I risks and the issues surrounding this. Patients with dementia often have very dry mouths resulting in more risk of tooth decay and gum disease along with other oral conditions. Some dementia medications also cause dry mouth so I am pleased that you are aware of these risks and considering them as part of the development of this product. I understand the huge risk for patients when fluid intake is reduced and the impact this can have.
Also oral care can be neglected in care homes due to lack of training or support for staff and absence of oral assessments or documentation of oral care. With the release of “Smiling Matters” we hope this will start to change.
Let’s use this as an opportunity to raise the profile of the importance of good oral health for everyone.

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What a brilliant idea. This would be very helpful in Australia where we have extreme heat!

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