New research shows promise for Phase 2/3 trial of inhaled insulin in people with MCI or mid Alzheimer’s disease – Alzheimer’s Society comment

Phase 2/3 clinical trial results shows early promise for an inhaled insulin spray in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild Alzheimer’s disease.

Phase 2/3 clinical trial results presented today (Wednesday 17 July) at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2019 in Los Angeles, has shown some early promise for an inhaled insulin spray in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild Alzheimer’s disease.

The trial was led by Suzanne Craft, PhD, Professor of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine at Wake Forest School of Medicine, in collaboration with the Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute led by Paul Aisen, MD.

Dr James Pickett, Head of Research at Alzheimer’s Society, says:

'The link between insulin and Alzheimer’s disease is an intriguing one – and something that we’re investing in through our clinical trial repurposing the diabetes drug - Liraglutide.

'We know that insulin administered through the nose can reach the brain faster, while not affecting the body’s blood sugar levels. At 12 months people using the insulin spray didn’t show any improvement, yet at 18 months a small group have started to show encouraging signs, performing better on memory tests and with improvement in biomarkers of Alzheimer’s.

'While this is a good sign, the bottom line is that it’s too early and the trial is too small to start the fanfare for a new disease modifying drug for dementia. We say it often, but more research is really needed – in this case, a larger trial.'

'It’s been over 15 years since we last had a new drug to treat dementia, and with one person developing symptoms every three minutes in the UK, funding more research could not be more important.'

Think this page could be useful to someone? Share it: