Matt Hancock meets the Jelly Drops team

Jelly Drops sweets available now - a simple and tasty way to boost daily water intake

Alzheimer’s Society has supported the development of Jelly Drops, bite-sized sweets designed to increase your water intake. Find out about the latest progress on the development of this exciting product.

This article was first published on 14 June 2019 and updated on 13 July 2020. 

What are Jelly Drops?

Jelly Drops are a bite-sized, sugar-free sweets containing 95 per cent water and added electrolytes. 

They were invented by Lewis Hornby, who was inspired by his grandmother and her love for sweets. Lewis developed bright, raindrop-shaped sweets as an easy way to increase her daily water intake. 

Lewis and his Jelly Drops team have worked alongside people with dementia, doctors and dementia psychologists to develop their fantastic product. 

Alzheimer’s Society is delighted to have partnered with Lewis and the Jelly Drops team over the last year through our Accelerator Programme

We are excited to announce that the Jelly Drops team have begun to deliver their fantastic product. 

Jelly drops

Lewis Hornby and his grandmother.

How Jelly Drops have helped people during the coronavirus pandemic

During the coronavirus pandemic, the Jelly Drops team have worked even harder to make their water sweets available to the most vulnerable people in our society.

People living in care homes have been a primary concern for the Jelly Drops team during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Jelly Drops team are also helping to cater to a small number of NHS coronavirus hospital wards, not just for the patients but also for the NHS staff. Members of staff are finding that long shifts and personal protective equipment (PPE) often leave them feeling dehydrated. 

Dehydration and dementia

Dehydration is a common challenge for older people, and especially those with dementia. Memory problems mean that people living with dementia can often forget to drink enough water. 

What’s more, the part of the brain that tells you when you’re thirsty, doesn’t always work properly. Unfortunately, this can lead to confusion and even hospitalisation.

Jelly Drops team

The Jelly Drops team.

How can I get some Jelly Drops? 

There has been a huge demand for Jelly Drops since they were first introduced to the public in June 2019.

Since then, the Jelly Drops team have been building up large-scale production as fast as they can. 

You can now order Jelly Drops online, either as a one-off purchase or subscription.

To get hold of your own Jelly Drops, visit the Jelly Drops website today.
 

Order Jelly Drops today

You can buy a single tray of Jelly Drops, or start a subscription via the website.

Buy Jelly Drops

120 comments

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A wonderful idea but I am curious how the development and marketing of these will be controlled to ensure they are safe for or are not given to somebody with a swallowing difficulty who requires texture modified fluids or diet. The risk being aspiration pneumonia. I will be very interested to see how this product develops. I wish you every success in its development.

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6

A great idea! But I would also ecco please make them diabetes friendly.

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3

Simple, brilliant!

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2

A great idea as it is a constant issue to try to keep people hydrated despite best intentions. Often people will take a 'sweet' as its small but will refuse a drink out of fear of incontinence. I wish you the very best of luck.

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4

Jelly drops they are going to be a God send to all concerned. Brilliant idea

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5

Many people with dementia also suffer from diabetes. Wouldn't it be sweet if Jelly Drops could be diabetic-friendly too?! Good luck!
(PS it may be worthwhile to state on the packaging, depending on the sugar content and eating instructions, "not suitable for diabetics".)

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7

These would have a wider application that just people with dementia. But I would be interested in how they are flavoured and sweetened. Can they be given to diabetics for instance?

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2

What a fantastic idea. My mother loved sugary jellies in her last few years and having hydrating ones would have been even better. Well done Jelly Drops team.

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2

We would love to test run these in our EMI home we have 74 residents all with varying degrees of dementia and although we really encourage fluid I take if the resident refuses then its is very difficult to keep them hydrated most of our lovely ladies and gents have a sweet tooth so this would go down a storm for sure xx

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8

Great idea but I would be cautious re. their use with a population in which swallowing difficulties are prevalent. Could pose a large choking risk. Would be interested to find out more and trial their texture.

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9

I currently do these at the care home where I work. As you pointed out tho at present they are not suitable for people with Dysphasia.

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2

I think you mean Dysphagia!
The term DysphaSIA is a speech/language issue.

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4

What do you use now? Is it something anyone can buy? My great aunt desperately needs something like this as she never drinks enough water unless someone is there telling her take a sip to every 10 minutes. Would be amazing to get something to help. Thanks

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8

Excellent comment. One has to think "out of the box " particularly when dealing with this type of condition.

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9

What a great idea. Definately would help keep my Mother better hydrated. If you want anyone to try them for marketing research please let me know.

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3

I think the jelly sweets are a great and innovative. I hope these are marketed soon

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2

Wow so simple yet so effective well done ! I hope to see them available very soon I know it work well for my mum

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