Hanna’s story: ‘Before my grandmother developed dementia…’

Read Hanna's dementia story about her grandmother's diagnosis, her involvement with Alzheimer's Society and why dementia shouldn't be a taboo.

Read about Hanna, who is one of the people supporting our new brand launch.

Hanna's dementia story

Before my grandmother developed dementia, she was the most confident person that I have ever known. She was so understanding and really knew how to make me feel better after a hard day.

Every time I would visit her, she would rush to the door and greet me with lots of kisses and with lots of delicious homemade food that I could never finish. We would chat for hours to make up for lost time. We would take photos with each other to add to our family scrapbook. She was the best grandmother ever because she was always there for me.

Now, dementia has taken her away from me. Dementia has stripped her of the once courageous and fun-loving woman that she once was. It’s heartbreaking to notice the decline in her abilities and speech.

A woman that used to be so talkative, can barely hold a conversation now, and a woman who used to be so independent, would need constant support to use the bathroom and climb up stairs.

Aside from all of that, I am so grateful that she is still with me and still smiling. She instantly lightens up my mood with her natural glow. I am so glad that she hasn’t lost her motivation to continue in life.

She’s a fighter and that’s what I most admire about her.

Joining Alzheimer’s Society

When I joined Alzheimer’s Society Cymru, I wanted to make sure that people from all different communities are represented and heard.

I wanted to get involved in events aimed at people from different ethnic backgrouns, and promote them on social media.

When the opportunity came up to be part of the new brand, I thought I have to take part for people who come from my background.

There isn’t a word for dementia in my language and it is a bit of a taboo topic, so I wanted to reassure people from all different types of backgrounds that the Society supports everyone, as dementia doesn’t discriminate.

I am really grateful for the positive comments about my involvement in the new brand and I hope that it will help people understand that Alzheimer’s Society supports everyone who are affected by dementia.

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Lovely to hear from you Hanna and for sharing your story. You are the 'light ' of her life, and I am sure that if she remembers anyone at all it will be you. I say this because our granddaughter is all that my husband, who has a diagnosis of Dementia, can talk about , if of anyone, and who can bring a smile to his face, over the 9 years since she was born.
And great that you are holding the banner for Dementia and BAME. Best wishes.

What is "Bame"? I live nearBelfast and haven't heard of it. I myself was recently diagnosed with Early Onset Alzheimers following a scan by a Consultant. My G.P diagnosed Depression and put me on Anti-depressants. Thankfully my son, who wasn't happy took me to a Consultant who organised a BrIn Scan which gave me the devastating news that I am now trying my best to come to terms with

Hi Joan, thank you for your comment. BAME stands for British, Black, Asian, and minority ethnic. We're sorry to hear about your recent diagnosis - if you'd like to speak to anyone from our Helpline team, please don't hesitate to call them on 0300 222 11 22. Thanks again and all the best.

Thanks for sharing this Hannah , such an inspiring story , you should be very proud of yourself - I am sure many people will find your experience motivating and make carers stronger. I am too involved in caring for Dementia Patients working as a Carer for secure healthcare solutions in the west midlands. It often gets very emotional but in the same time makes you hopeful when you see children and family members of dementia patients staying united and hoping for a better tomorrow. What I also find is that many people are afraid to seek help or guidance , Guess they are just confused and afraid to talk about their experiences. Joining active charities like the Alzheimer’s Society is for sure a great way for carers to find support and the love they need to keep them strong in these difficult moments.

Please , do keep up the great work.

Best Wishes

Sab

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